Writer's Guide to Government Information

Resources to inject real life detail into your fiction

United States Navy in Desert Shield / Desert Storm (Naval History and Heritage Command)

United States Navy in Desert Shield / Desert Storm (Naval History and Heritage Command)

(HTML: https://web.archive.org/web/20141006090324/http://www.history.navy.mil/wars/dstorm/index.html)
(Paper: http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/25081170)

Representative questions that can be answered with this resource:

  • How were Navy medical personnel deployed to the Gulf as part of Desert Shield?
  • What was involved in carrying out the marine interception campaign?
  • How did the Navy treat peace activists who opposed the Marine interception campaign?
  • How much and what kinds of food did the carrier John F. Kennedy get prior to their six month deployment to the Gulf?

Description:

The online version of this document is divided into an executive summary, seven sections and a set of appendices. The odd part about the appendices is that a list of appendices from A – P is provided, but text is only available for appendices A and B without any explanation of the missing text. The missing appendices should available in paper copies housed in libraries.

The main sections of this report are:

  • I. Overview (Includes history of Mideast Navy operations since 1945)
  • II. “The Gathering Storm” (Activities during Desert Shield)
  • III. “A Common Goal” (Joint Operations)
  • IV. “Bullets, Bandages and Beans” (Logistics)
  • V. “Thunder and Lightning” (Air & Ground Action)
  • VI. “Lessons Learned and Summary”
  • VII. Epilogue

This work provides a background of the issues and challenges that Navy characters would have had to face during this period. It could also be used as a template to create reports on fictitious wars of the future.

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