Writer's Guide to Government Information

Resources to inject real life detail into your fiction

Archive for the tag “korean war”

Office of Medical History (Army)

Office of Medical History (Army) – http://history.amedd.army.mil

Representative questions that can be answered with this resource:

  • What were some preventative measures taken by the US Army in the American Revolution?
  • When were US soldiers first vaccinated for smallpox?
  • What was considered typical care during the Civil War?
  • What were World War I base camp hospitals like?

Description:

This site is divided into a number of sections, but the most helpful will be:

Books and Documents – materials from Revolutionary times to the the Iraq War. Some representative titles are:

  • The Evolution of Preventive Medicine in the United States Army, 1607-1939
  • Medical Men in the American Revolution, 1775-1783 by Louis C. Duncun
  • Thesis: A Study of the Medical Support to the Union and Confederate Armies During the Battle of Chickamauga: Lessons and Implications for Today’s U.S. Army Medical Department Leaders by David A. Rubenstein
  • The U.S. Army Medical Department in the San Francisco Earthquake of 1906
  • Women in the Army Medical Department in World War II
  • Battle Casualties in Korea: Studies of the Surgical Research Team, Volume II, Tools for Resuscitation
  • In Their Own Words: The 498th Air Ambulance Company in Iraq, 2003

Historical Art Work – Captioned images and photographs from WWI through the Iraq War. The Office of Medical History discourages the use of this imagery for commercial or partisan publications, but does not disclose their authority for prohibiting these uses.

Medal of Honor recipients – Short citations of medical personnel awarded the Medal of Honor.

AMEDD Unit Patches and Lineage – Patches and organization histories from Army Medical units.

As you might gather from the title of this resource, it will be most helpful in determining what level of field medicine is available to your military characters in a given period of time.

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Vietnam-Era Prisoner-of-War/Missing-in-Action Database

The Vietnam-Era Prisoner-of-War/Missing-in-Action Database – http://lcweb2.loc.gov/frd/pow/

Representative questions that can be answered with this resource:

  • Where can I find stories of alleged ham radio contact with POWs?
  • What were military letters to spouses and parents like?
  • What stories were told about Vietnam POWs after the end of the war in 1975?
  • Where can I find a map of a POW camp?
  • Where can I learn about Korean War MIAs?

Description:

As the title of this resource indicates, this is a database of documents related to POWs and MIAs. What the database doesn’t indicate is that it has some records relating to the Korean War. Most of the the documents appear to evaluations of various reports of POWs and MIA soldiers. The original reports do not appear to be in the database, only the summary and responses. Correspondence to families is included in the database. Maps and low quality photographs are also contained in the database.

The database has a simple search box with no opportunity for fielded searches. Searching by name will often by useful. Terms are searched against brief database catalog records which are usually, but not always linked to PDFs files. The PDF files themselves have no searchable text.

The front page of the database also contains links to a number of documents of general interest relating to the Vietnam War, including:

  • Updated Casualty List
  • Estimative Products on Vietnam, 1948-1975 (PDF)
  • Peers Inquiry (My Lai)
  • The “McCain Bill” (PDF)
  • U.S. Senate Select Committee on POW/MIA Affairs
  • U.S. House of Representatives Select Committee on Missing Persons in Southeast Asia

Search Tips:

Although this database is a free text search, you can use the headings of records to narrow your results or focus on an area of interest. Some useful terms are:

  • [Country Name] – North Vietnam (NVN), South Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, Soviet Union, Laos
  • field investigation report
  • Korean War
  • Letters to wife and parents
  • Group photograph
  • Ham radio
  • Photograph
  • Post-1975 Vietnam
  • PW camp

U.S. Marine operations in Korea, 1950-1953 (v. 1-5)

U.S. Marine operations in Korea, 1950-1953 (v. 1-5)

(Paper: http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/11671005)

(Online: http://catalog.hathitrust.org/api/volumes/oclc/11671005.html v.1-4 fulltext, v.5 search only)

Representative questions that can be answered with this resource:

  • Where can I find a map of the Seoul Assault Plan of September 26, 1950?
  • What happened on the last fight on Hill 296?
  • How was the 1st Marine Tank Division organized during the first part of the Korean War?
  • What was the BADGER line?

Description:

From the preface to each of the first four volumes:

Volume I is designed to give the military student and the casual reader an accurate and detailed account of the operations in which Marines of the 1st Provisional Brigade and Marine Air Group 33 participated during the fighting in the Pusan Perimeter, from the date of their landing on 2 August until their withdrawal on 13 September 1950, in preparation for the Inchon landing.

This is the second volume of a series dealing with United States Marine Operations in Korea during the period 2 August 1950 to 27 July 1953. Volume II presents in detail the operations of the 1st Marine Division and the 1st Marine Aircraft Wing as a part of X Corps, USA, during and immediately following the Inchon Landing on 15 September 1950.

This is the third in a series of five volumes dealing with the operations of the United States Marine Corps in Korea during the period 2 August 1950 to 27 July 1953. Volume III presents in detail the operations of the 1st Marine Division and 1st Marine Aircraft Wing as a part of X Corps, USA, in the Chosin Reservoir campaign. The time covered in this book extends from the administrative landing at Wonsan on 26 October 1950 to the Hungnam evacuation which ended on Christmas Eve.

This is the fourth in a series of five volumes dealing with the operations of United States Marines in Korea during the period 2 August 1950 to 27 July 1953. Volume IV presents in detail the operations of the 1st Marine Division and 1st Marine Aircraft Wing, the former while operating under Eighth Army control and also as part of IX Corps and X Corps, USA, and the latter while controlled by the Fifth Air Force.

The four online volumes have narrative text followed by appendices, an index and a listing of photos, maps and illustrations.

US Army in the Korean War (Series) (Center of Military History)

US Army in the Korean War (Series) (Center of Military History) – http://www.history.army.mil/html/bookshelves/collect/usakw.html

Representative questions that can be answered with this resource:

  • Where can I find a copy of the Armistice Agreement that ended the Korean War?
  • What was LITTLE SWITCH?
  • What do symbols on military maps of the 1950s mean?
  • Where can I find photos of admirals who served during the Korean War?

Description:

This page links to electronic versions of:

  • Policy and direction: The first year
  • South to the Naktong, north to the Yalu
  • Truce tent and fighting front
  • Ebb and flow

These represent all of the books in this series except “Medics’ War.” The books have narrative text which in all cases is followed by lists of tables, charts and maps. Some books have appendices and two have an index. The four books are available in PDF and HTML.

Although the “Medics’ War” volume is not available in electronic full text through the Center of Military History, it is available online through the HathiTrust digital library at http://hdl.handle.net/2027/mdp.39015051829276.

Story idea:

If your science fiction story requires a treaty between wary powers, the armistice agreement found in Truce tent and fighting front might come in handy.

U.S. Air Force’s First War: Korea 1950-1953 Significant Events

U.S. Air Force’s First War: Korea 1950-1953 Significant Events
https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/8c3a/588e1dd6519aad537c73bf433798e6f2d86c.pdf

Representative questions that can be answered with this resource:

  • When did US intelligence find vital parts from a MIG 15?
  • How many sorties did the Fifth Air Force run in April 1951?
  • What was the effect of the first attack against previously excluded irrigation dams on May 13, 1953?

Description:

From the preface:

The chronology points out the relationship of these operations to the land battle, naval operations, and important political and diplomatic events. It also identifies such USAF historical firsts as the first all-jet air battle, the introduction of new weapons systems, and the initiation of tactics, techniques, or procedures that had a major impact on later air operations. The chronology also identifies important people, such as key commanders, recipients of the Medal of Honor, and aces. Finally, it attempts to summarize those USAF events in Korea that best illustrate the air war and the application of airpower in the theater.

The chronology offers a monthly summary, then a listing of daily events.

United States Air Forces in Korea, 1950-1953

The United States Air Forces in Korea, 1950-1953, by Robert F. Futrell (1961). 774 pages.

(Paper: http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/55117954)
(PDF: https://media.defense.gov/2010/Dec/02/2001329903/-1/-1/0/AFD-101202-022.pdf)

 

Representative questions that can be answered with this resource:

  • Who commanded the US Far East Forces in May 1951?
  • What did AFOOP stand for?
  • Who was the youngest American flying ace in the Korean War?
  • What did the aftermath of a napalm strike look like?

 

Story Ideas:

Aside from providing background for stories set in this time and place, writers may find the attitudes of the Air Force towards air power useful in describing military views of other weaponry in science fiction stories. Similarly events at the United Nations and at the truce talks might have value in describing similar situations in fictional wars here and elsewhere.

United States Air Force Operations in the Korean Conflict, 1 July 1952-27 July 1953

United States Air Force Operations in the Korean Conflict, 1 July 1952-27 July 1953, by Robert F. Futrell (1956). 352 pages.

(Paper: http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/12234957)

 

Representative questions that can be answered with this resource:

  • Why was the area around Kaesong known as “Holy Land” in the Korean War?
  • Where can I learn more about the Photographic Technical Services during the Korean War?
  • Where can I find a map of North Korean searchlights in 1953?

Description:

Like its predecessor publication, this work ”is conceived as an operational history, with no more consideration for administrative and logistical problems than is necessary to understand the employment of air units in combat.”

In addition to the main text, there is a glossary, footnotes and an index. There is also a list of maps and charts. Index entries for operation and specific mission names are in uppercase.

All three of these volumes ought to provide helpful background in stories featuring military characters during the 1950s.

United States Air Force Operations in the Korean Conflict, 1 November 1950-30 June 1952

United States Air Force Operations in the Korean Conflict, 1 November 1950-30 June 1952 by Robert F. Futrell (1955). 296 pages. –  http://www.afhra.af.mil/Portals/16/documents/Studies/51-100/AFD-090601-064.pdf

Representative questions that can be answered with this resource:

  • Where can I learn more about the operations of the Korean Weather Service?
  • What were the areas of Communist MIG-15 operations?
  • Where can I find a map to North Korean airfields?
  • What was Operation Bullrat?

Description:

Like its predecessor publication, This work ”is conceived as an operational history, with no more consideration for administrative and logistical problems than is necessary to understand the employment of air units in combat.”

In addition to the main text, there is a glossary, footnotes and an index. There is also a list of maps and charts. Index entries for operation and specific mission names are in uppercase.

United States Air Force Operations in the Korean Conflict, 25 June-1 November 1950

United States Air Force Operations in the Korean Conflict, 25 June-1 November 1950, by Robert F. Futrell (1951). 139 pages. – http://www.afhra.af.mil/Portals/16/documents/Studies/51-100/AFD-090601-061.pdf

Representative questions that can be answered with this resource:

  • Where were the principal communications lines of Korea in 1950?
  • How was the US Far East Command organized prior to the Korean War?
  • What do bridges look like when they are destroyed?

Description:

From the foreward: “The monograph is conceived as an operational history, with no more consideration for administrative and logistical problems than is necessary to understand the employment of air units in combat.”

In addition to the main text, there is a glossary, footnotes and an index. There is also a list of illustrations and a list of maps and charts. Index entries for operation and specific mission names are in uppercase.

Medal of Honor Recipients – Korean War (Center of Military History)

Medal of Honor Recipients – Korean War (Center of Military History) – http://www.history.army.mil/html/moh/koreanwar.html

Representative questions that can be answered with this resource:

  • Where can I find stories of people who used grenades to attack the enemy at the cost of their own life?
  • Where can I find a story of a fighting medic?
  • Where can I find instances of soldiers deliberately exposing themselves to enemy fire?

Description:

Alphabetical listing of Medal of Honor recipients for service during the Korean War. Each entry has name of soldier, service, other brief biographical information followed by a citation a paragraph or so in length. An asterisk indicates a posthumous award.

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